dental embryology

dental embryology
The development of the teeth initiates from the oral epithelium, beginning at 40 days of intrauterine life. In the first stage, or bud stage, there is an invagination into the mesenchyme of the jaw that gives rise to the tooth bud or primordial tooth. The following tissues can be differentiated in the next stage: the inner enamel epithelium and the outer enamel epithelium, which form a “cap” over the dental papilla. The dentin starts to form from outside in, initially from the cells of the inner enamel epithelium and subsequently from the differentiation of the cells of the dental papilla (the odontoblasts). After the first layer of dentin is organized, the cells of the external dental epithelium (now the ameloblasts) begin to move outwards, forming the dental enamel; the crown stage has started. Finally, the dental pulp forms in the dental papilla and the support tissues (the cement, the periodontal ligament and the alveolar bone) in the dental follicle (1)(2).

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