Dental anatomy , the posterior region II : the molars

Dental anatomy , the posterior region II : the molars
The molars present a much larger occlusal surface than the premolars; they have a cuboid form and the mesiodistal diameter is larger in the lower molars than in the upper molars. The upper molars have three roots, a stronger lingual root and two buccal roots, of which the more important is the mesiobuccal; the lower molars, in contrast, have two roots, one mesial and the other distal, of similar sizes. Both the first and second upper molars are very important teeth due to their active participation in mastication. Due to the complexity of their anatomic structure and the presence of grooves on their occlusal surface, these are teeth that are relatively susceptible to developing caries. The absence of molars in the oral cavity leads to a series of esthetic and functional problems, including facial changes and the development of creases at the labial commissures, as well as causing problems for the correct articulation of the dental arches (6)(7).

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